Influencer Marketing

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Consumers are always looking to experts for guidance and inspiration. Bloggers, social influencers (on Instagram, Snapchat, etc) can influence others to use their purchasing power on buy. These experts, or social stars, are called influencers.

To engage with their audiences, today most of the times brands need to reach out influencers so they can have a connection with their target groups.

What type of influencers can you have?

1 – Brand Ambassadors

A Brand Ambassador is someone hired for the brand to promote and represent the brand, rather than have a single campaign.

2 – Content Creators

You can stablish a campaign with a content creator, for example, on Instagram, Youtube, Snapchat or Twitter, so the content creator generate content to his followers promoting your brand or product. You can think on these campaign in a micro way to just reach a niche or in a macro way to reach a broader audience. There are influencers followed by millions of people all around the world.

Consumers moved by digital

According to Deloitte, more than 60% of the in-store sales are influenced now by digital, and their projection is that this number will be closer to 90% in less than 5 years. Influencers are very important because they mix empower other brands with their brand, as they are “they are not tied directly to retailers or brands.”

Payments

The prices normally depend on the reach or if the niche is valuable. The spend can go from hundreds of dollars to thousands of euros, say Digiday. If the influencers have very micro influence, sometimes an offer like samples can produce good results. Often they will try and recommend the products.

Programmatic

As the content can be so specific to each influencer, doing influencer marketing via programmatic is a big challenge. At the moment the influencer marketing cannot be done programmatic, but there are agencies specialized just on doing it, and hire those agencies can speed up the process. According to emarketer, 59% of the Influencer Marketing campaigns are for product launches.